Nov 202009
 

vlcsnap-00002

Myra and I are still watching Idiot. One more session to go. But I need something to watch while running on the elliptical machine, so for that I’ve been re-watching Obyknovennoye Chudo. With the music and all the weird scene changes it’s a good one to accompany physical activity.

Speaking of strange twists, this is one I missed before. It’s a scene to make you go, “Huh? Where did that come from?” It takes place at the remote hunting lodge in the mountains. It’s a scene that has nothing to do with anything that has gone before, as far as I can tell. The hunter is comparing his craft to literary or artistic work, complete with the critics he has to endure.

vlcsnap-00003

On the other hand, maybe it does have something to do with what has gone before. The volshebnik (writer/magician) who is creating the story that is unfolding wants to do something interesting with his talents. But his creative efforts are for the sake of his wife, not for the sake of innovation or creativity.

vlcsnap-00004

As one who has long thought that teaching creativity is a good way to kill creativity, it could be that I agree with Mark Zakharov on the subject. (It’s risky to be absolutely certain about it, given my unfamiliarity with the language. I probably miss a lot of subtle points that would help me understand better.)

Reticulator

  • // As one who has long thought that teaching creativity is a good way to kill creativity, it could be that I agree with Mark Zakharov on the subject. (It’s risky to be absolutely certain about it, given my unfamiliarity with the language. I probably miss a lot of subtle points that would help me understand better.) //

    Well, you are near-by a truth (as for a sense of the scene, and as for Mark Zakharov), I think 😉

    By the way, this Mark Zakharov’s film “An Ordinary Miracle” is not based on an original text. The play first was film screened in 1964. An author is Evgeny Shvarts. May say, the Mark Zakharov’s movie is a remake, although his adaptation is absolutely unique.

    btw, here is first film adaptation (1964):

    http://www.kino-teatr.ru/kino/movie/sov/4638/foto/

  • Reticulator

    Thanks again, Alexander. It looks like that 1964 version had a hunter, too. Someday I’ll have to find a way to see it.

  • Natan Kumanov

    Hello again,

    You do have to learn Russian a bit better to understand this! 😉 “It’s a scene to make you go, “Huh? Where did that come from?”” — No, it does not. The girl (the princess) has escaped from her father, and that’s the place where she is hiding, dressed as a boy; not a hunting lodge, but a hotel (no idea why the hotel was placed there in such a remote place, apparently only for the artistic reasons). The girl has escaped, because she received an offence from the man she loved (The Bear). In the scene a bit further, she laughs on him (he does not recognise her under her redress) and then fights with him with swords. The hunter is one who does not hunt, because he is afraid for his fame; he is a parody on people who don’t risk to do the actual art and prefer only to talk of it. I would say one of the topics of the film is what people endure to do for love of beauty (take that monologue of the Volshebnik, the Master: “… the Sages rise to the Sky and descend to the Hell for love of Truth…”, and truth is one of kinds of beauty, is not it?).

  • John B Gorentz

    Hi, Natan

    The part about the princess, the “bear”, and the father came through OK. What I had trouble with is understanding how the hunter fits in. Your explanation about a non-hunting hunter adds a bit to what I had figured so far. Thanks!

    I wrote this a long time ago, but still have a long way to go before I would understand all of this in Russian.

  • Natan Kumanov

    That’s okay. I must say I don’t have your experience of watching movies in foreign languages, but I imagine how difficult it must be from that little experience that I had. Thank you for your blog!