Sep 132011
 

Over at Cape Girardeau History and Photos, Ken Steinhoff posted a 1960s photo of a man wearing a straw cap of what I call the French Foreign Legion style.   It elicited some admiring comments.

It also reminded me of another type of hat from the same era — A type of dress hat that I’ve seen in at least two Russian movies.   These are not movies from the 1960s, but are set in the late 50s and 60s.   The first is Serye Volki, in which Nikita Khrushchev and Anastas Mikoyan are wearing see-through dress hats.  I presume these were considered good for the relatively warm weather of Crimea, although in this case it was October 1964 and Khrushchev was in the process of being removed from power.

The hat is so transparent that you can even see Khrushchev’s (Rolan Bykov’s) bald head through it.

This hat, worn by the Savva Ignatevich character in Povrovskiye Vorota, is not quite as transparent, but in the movie (as opposed to screenshots) you can more easily see that it’s a porous material.   It goes well with his white summer suit.

Were hats like these ever worn in the United States?   I don’t recall ever seeing any, but then, where I lived as a kid I  never saw a man wearing a white summer suit, either.   I’m pretty sure they existed.

One thing we didn’t have in the U.S. (unfortunately) is the kind of Ukrainian shirt the Khrushchev and Ignatevich characters are wearing.  I presume there’s a name for it but I don’t know what it is.  (I’m not even sure it’s Ukrainian, as opposed to Russian.)

Reticulator

  • // One thing we didn’t have in the U.S. (unfortunately) is the kind of Ukrainian shirt the Khrushchev and Ignatevich characters are wearing. I presume there’s a name for it but I don’t know what it is. (I’m not even sure it’s Ukrainian, as opposed to Russian.) //

    It is a “kosovorotka” that means a slanting neck: kosoy + vorot = kosovorotka.
    Really, this sort of shirt is Ukrainian and Russian clothes, but the design we see here (and that was worn to 1960s, I suppose) it’s a stylized thing, not an original ethnographic one.

    As for the “see-through dress hats”, I saw the same during my childhood in late 1970s – 1980s in Ural (!), at summer season, of course. But these hats went out of fashion, so only the pensioners wore such hats.

  • Reticulator

    Hi, Alexander.

    Sounds like maybe that word vorot is a cognate of the one in Pokrovsky Vorota. I can at least imagine a similarity in meaning. I think a kosovorotka like Savva Ignatevich’s with suit jacket or sports jacket would fit in well with recent styles — I wouldn’t mind wearing one of those myself if people of kraut ancestry are allowed to wear them — but I haven’t seen anything exactly like that where I live.

    I suppose I shouldn’t have used Ignatevich as a standalone word, since it looks like a patronymic and not a family name.

    I think the first time I saw a white summer suit in person was July 4, 1976, when Hubert Horatio Humphrey was campaigning for president. He was wearing one of those when he gave an old-fashioned stemwinder of a speech at a city park where our family had gone for the day’s celebration — all day and well into the evening. I didn’t care to vote for him, but I liked his suit.

    John